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Mobile Shop Management System

  • Project Report
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Kishan Chandra
Kishan Chandra
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INDEX Particular Page no. 1) Acknowledgment 2) Preface 3) Introduction 4) Objective 5) Computational Environment 5.1) Hardware Requirements 5.2) Software Requirements 6) Data Flow Diagram 7) System Design 7.1) Design Methodology 7.2) Database Design 7.3.1) Data Dictionary 7.3) Form Design 7.4.1) Screen Shots/Forms 8) System Testing 9) System Implementation 10) Conclusion 10.1) Benefits of the project 10.2) Future enhancements of the project 1

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11) References 2

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PREFACE The evolution of electronic computers began in 1940’s. With the coming of the multiprogramming operating systems in the early 1960’s and later with the implementation and distribution the usability and efficiency of the computing machines took a big leap. Prices of hardware also decreased and awareness of computers increased substantially since their early days. With the availability of cheaper and more powerful machines, higher level languages, and more user-friendly languages, the applications of computers grew rapidly. The use of computers is growing very rapidly. Now computer systems are used in such areas as business applications, scientific work, air traffic control, missile control, hospital management, airline reservations and medical diagnostic equipment. There is probably no discipline that does not use computer systems now. With this increased use of computers, the need for software is increasing- imagine the complexity of the software for the various monitoring systems. Actually, the complexity of applications and the software systems has grown much faster than our ability to deal with it. 3

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INTRODUCTION 4

Lecture Notes