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Note for Circuit Theory - CT By ANNA SUPERKINGS

  • Circuit Theory - CT
  • Note
  • ANNA UNIVERISTY - HITECH
  • Electronics and Communication Engineering
  • 4 Topics
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Anna Superkings
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EE6201 CIRCUIT THEORY SL. NO. CONTENTS UNIT I BASIC CIRCUITS ANALYSIS 1.1. INTRODUCTION: 1.2. BASIC ELEMENTS & INTRODUCTORY CONCEPTS: 1.3. KIRCHOFF'S LAW 1.4. PROBLEMS AND CALCULATIONS: 1.5. DC CIRCUITS: 1.6. AC CIRCUITS: 1.7. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AC AND DC: 1.8. PARALLEL NETWORKS: 1.9. MESH ANALYSIS: 1.10. NODAL ANALYSIS: PAGE NO 6 6 6 7 9 12 12 13 15 17 24 36 QUESTION BANK UNIT II NETWORK REDUCTION AND NETWORK THEOREMS FOR DC ANDAC CIRCUITS 2.1. NETWORK REDUCTION: 2.2. VOLTAGE AND CURRENT DIVISION: 2.3. POTENTIAL DIVIDER: 2.4. VOLTAGE SOURCE TO CURRENT SOURCE TRANSFORMATION: 2.5. CURRENT SOURCE TO VOLTAGE SOURCE TRANSFORMATION: 2.6. STAR DELTA CONVERSION: 2.7. THEVENINS THEOREM: 2.8. NORTON’S THEOREM: 42 42 42 42 47 47 47 51 57 QUESTION BANK 60 UNIT III RESONANCE AND COUPLED CIRCUITS 3.1. SERIES AND PARALLEL RESONANCE THEIR FREQUENCY RESPONSE 3.2. QUALITY FACTOR AND BANDWIDTH 3.3. SELF AND MUTUAL INDUCTANCE 3.4. COEFFICIENT OF COUPLING 3.5. TUNED CIRCUITS 66 66 67 70 72 73 QUESTION BANK 76 UNIT IV TRANSIENT RESPONSE FOR DC CIRCUITS 4.1. INTRODUCTION: 4.2. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF RL CIRCUITS: 4.3. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF RC CIRCUITS 4.4. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF RLC CIRCUITS 4.5. CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO PORT NETWORKS IN TERMS OF Z,Y AND 4.6. H PARAMETERS. 93 93 94 99 101 104 109 QUESTION BANK UNIT – V ANALYSING THREE PHASE CIRCUITS SCE 4 of 162 138 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

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EE6201 5.1. 5.2. CIRCUIT THEORY INTRODUCTION: PHASOR DIAGRAM OF THREE PHASE SUPPLY: QUESTION BANK MODEL QUESTION PAPERS SCE 5 of 162 138 138 149 152 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

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EE6201 CIRCUIT THEORY UNIT I BASIC CIRCUITS ANALYSIS Ohm’s Law – Kirchoffs laws – DC and AC Circuits – Resistors in series and parallel circuits – Meshcurrent and node voltage method of analysis for D.C and A.C. circuits – Phasor Diagram – Power,Power Factor and Energy 1.1.INTRODUCTION: The interconnection of various electric elements in a prescribed manner comprises as an electric circuit in order to perform a desired function. The electric elements include controlled and uncontrolled source of energy, resistors, capacitors, inductors, etc. Analysis of electric circuits refers to computations required to determinethe unknown quantities such as voltage, current and power associated with one or more elements in the circuit. To contribute to the solution of engineering problems one must acquire the basic knowledge of electric circuit analysis and laws. Many other systems, like mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, magnetic and power system are easy to analyze and model by a circuit. To learn how to analyze the models of these systems, first one needs to learn the techniques of circuit analysis. We shall discuss briefly some of the basic circuit elements and the laws that will help us to develop the background of subject. 1.2. BASIC ELEMENTS & INTRODUCTORY CONCEPTS: Electrical Network: A combination of various electric elements (Resistor, Inductor, Capacitor, Voltage source, Current source) connected in any manner what so ever is called an electrical network. We may classify circuit elements in two categories, passiveand active elements. Passive Element: The element which receives energy (or absorbs energy) and then either converts it into heat (R) or stored it in an electric (C) or magnetic (L) field is called passive element. Active Element: The elements that supply energy to the circuit is called active element.Examples of active elements include voltage and current sources, generators, and electronic devices that require power supplies. A transistor is an active circuit element, meaning that it can amplify power of a signal. On the other hand, transformer is not an active element because it does not amplify the power level and power remains same both in primary and secondary sides. Transformer is an example of passive element. Bilateral Element: Conduction of current in both directions in an element (example: Resistance; Inductance; Capacitance) with same magnitude is termed as bilateral element. Unilateral Element: SCE 6 of 162 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

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EE6201 CIRCUIT THEORY Conduction of current in one direction is termed as unilateral (example: Diode, Transistor) element. Meaning of Response: An application of input signal to the system will produce an output signal, the behavior of output signal with time is known as the response of the system. Potential Energy Difference: The voltage or potential energy difference between two points in an electric circuit is the amount of energy required to move a unit charge between the two points. Ohm’s Law:Ohm's law states that the current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference or voltage across the two points, and inversely proportional to the resistance between them. The mathematical equation that describes this relationship is: where I is the current through the resistance in units of amperes, V is the potential difference measured across the resistance in units of volts, and R is the resistance of the conductor in units of ohms. More specifically, Ohm's law states that the R in this relation is constant, independent of the current. 1.3. KIRCHOFF'S LAW Kirchoff's First Law - The Current Law, (KCL) "The total current or charge entering a junction or node is exactly equal to the charge leaving the node as it has no other place to go except to leave, as no charge is lost within the node". In other words the algebraic sum of ALL the currents entering and leaving a node must be equal to zero, I(exiting) + I(entering) = 0. This idea by Kirchoff is known as the Conservation of Charge. SCE 7 of 162 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

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