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Computer Integrated Manufacturing

by Bput Toppers
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Computer Integrated Manufacturing by Bput Toppers

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DEPARTMENT OF PRODUCTION ENGINEERING Lecture Notes on COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (CIM) COURSE CODE: BMS 406: PE-II 7th Semester B. Tech in Production Engineering 0
BMS 406: PE-II: COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (3-1-0): Syllabus Module-I Introduction: The meaning and origin of CIM, The changing manufacturing and management scenario, External communication, Islands of automation and software, Dedicated and open systems, Manufacturing automation protocol, Product related activities of a company, Marketing engineering, Production planning, Plant operations, Physical distribution, Business and financial management. [06 Lectures] Computer Aided Process planning: Role of process planning in CAD/CAM integration, Approaches to computer aided process planning- Variant approach and Generative approaches, CAPP and CMPP process planning systems. [04 Lectures] Module-II Shop Floor Control and FMS: Shop floor control-phases, Factory data collection system, Automatic identification methods- Bar code technology, Automated data collection system, FMS-components of FMS - types -FMS workstation, Material handling and storage systems, FMS layout, Computer control systems-application and benefits. [10 Lectures] Module-III CIM Implementation: CIM and company strategy, System modeling tools-IDEF models, Activity cycle diagram, CIM open system architecture (CIMOSA), Manufacturing enterprise wheel, CIM architecture, Product data management, CIM implementation software. [06 Lectures] Data Communication: Communication fundamentals, Local area networks, Topology, LAN implementations, Network management and installations. [04 Lectures] Module-IV CIM System: Open System Open systems inter connection, Manufacturing automations protocol and technical office protocol (MAP /TOP). [04 Lectures] Database for CIM: Development of databases, Database terminology, Architecture of database systems, Data modeling and data associations, Relational data bases, Database operators, Advantages of data base. [06 Lectures] TEXT BOOK(S): 1. Automation, Production Systems and Computer Integrated Manufacturing- M.P.Groover, Pearson Education. 2. Computer Integrated Manufacturing System- Y. Koren, McGraw-Hill. REFERENCE(S): 1. CAD/CAM/CIM- P. Radhakrishnan, S. Subramanyan and V. Raju- New Age International. 2. Computer Integrated Manufacturing- Paul G. Ranky, Prentice Hall International. 1
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Module-I Introduction: The meaning and origin of CIM, The changing manufacturing and management scenario, External communication, Islands of automation and software, Dedicated and open systems, Manufacturing automation protocol, Product related activities of a company, Marketing engineering, Production planning, Plant operations, Physical distribution, Business and financial management. Computer Aided Process planning: Role of process planning in CAD/CAM integration, Approaches to computer aided process planning- Variant approach and Generative approaches, CAPP and CMPP process planning systems. 1. Introduction to CIM Initially, machine tool automation started with the development of numerical control in 1950s. In less than 50 years, it is amazing that today’s manufacturing plants are completely automated. However, establishment of these plants gave relatively a few varieties of product. At first we define what do we mean by a manufacturing plant? Here, we are considering a several categories of manufacturing (or production) for the various manufacturing plants. Manufacturing can be considered in three broad areas: (i) Continuous process production, (ii) Mass production, and (iii) job-shop production. Among these three, mass production and job-shop production can be categorized as discrete- item production. Continuous Process Production Such type of product flows continuously in the manufacturing system, e.g. petroleum, cement, steel rolling, petrochemical and paper production etc. Equipment used here are only applicable for small group of similar products. 2
Mass Production It includes the production of discrete unit at very high rate of speed. Discrete item production is used for goods such as automobiles, refrigerators, televisions, electronic component and so on. Mass production contains the character of continuous process production for discrete products. That’s why mass production has realized enormous benefits from automation and mechanization. Job Shop Production A manufacturing facility that produces a large number of different discrete items and requires different sequences among the production equipments is called job shop. Scheduling and routine problems are the essential features of job shop. As a result automation has at best been restricted to individual component of job shop. But there have been few attempts in the field of total automation. Physical components of an automated manufacturing system do not include continuous flow process as it only consists of a small percentage of manufacturing system. Mass production of discrete items is included in this category, where segments of production line are largely automated but not the entire line. Job shop facilities have used automated machines, but transfer of work among these machines is a difficult task. Apart from some physical equipment needed, a major component of the automated information that needs to be made available to the manufacturing operation must come from product design. This allows a plant to be automated and integrated. However, manufacturing is more concerned with process design rather than product design. The characteristic of present world market include higher competition, short product life cycle, greater product diversity, fragmented market, variety and complexity, and smaller batch sizes to satisfy a variety of customer profile. Furthermore, non price factors such as quality of product design innovation and delivery services are the preliminary determinant for the success of product. In today’s global arena, to achieve these requirements manufacturing company needs to be flexible, adaptable and responsive to changes and be able to produce a variety of products in short time and at lower cost. These issues attract manufacturing industries to search for some advanced technology, 3

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