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Note for Software Engineering - SE by Technical Sharma Ji

  • Software Engineering - SE
  • Note
  • Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya Bhopal - rgpv
  • Master of Computer Applications
  • MCA
  • 16 Topics
  • 249 Views
  • Uploaded 8 months ago
Technical Sharma Ji
Technical Sharma Ji
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SOFTWARE ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY: THE WATERSLUICE a dissertation submitted to the department of computer science and the committee on graduate studies of stanford university in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of doctor of philosophy By Ron Burback December 1998

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c Copyright 1999 by Ron Burback All Rights Reserved ii

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I certify that I have read this dissertation and that in my opinion it is fully adequate, in scope and quality, as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Gio Wiederhold (Principal Adviser) I certify that I have read this dissertation and that in my opinion it is fully adequate, in scope and quality, as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. David Luckham I certify that I have read this dissertation and that in my opinion it is fully adequate, in scope and quality, as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Eric Roberts I certify that I have read this dissertation and that in my opinion it is fully adequate, in scope and quality, as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Dorothea Beringer Approved for the University Committee of Graduate Studies: iii

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Preface The body of methods, rules, postulates, procedures, and processes that are used to manage a software engineering project are collectively referred to as a methodology. There are two well-known software engineering methodologies commonly used in practice today. The two methodologies, informally known as the waterfall and spiral methodologies, are characterized by the grouping of tasks as either sequential or cyclical. Both of these methodologies organize some tasks very well, but have a narrow focus, so that crucial aspects of one methodology are missed by the other methodology. This thesis defines the WaterSluice methodology. The WaterSluice borrows the iterative nature of the cyclical methodology along with the steady progression of the sequential methodology. In addition, the tasks in the WaterSluice are prioritized such that the most beneficial, non-conflicting tasks are accomplished first. A collection of theorems is presented establishing the strengths and weaknesses of the WaterSluice as compared to the sequential and cyclical methodologies. The WaterSluice methodology represents a more accurate rendering of current software engineering practices. In this sense, the WaterSluice is not new but merely represents a concise description of the state of the art. iv

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