×
Excuses Don't get results
--Your friends at LectureNotes
Close

Mechanics

by Md Wesh Karni
Type: NoteInstitute: Biju Patnaik University of Technology BPUT Views: 26Uploaded: 10 months agoAdd to Favourite

Share it with your friends

Suggested Materials

Leave your Comments

Contributors

Md Wesh Karni
Md Wesh Karni
Contents I Preliminaries 1 Physical theories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1 Consequences of Newtonian dynamical and measurement theories 2 The physical arena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Symmetry and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Lie groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.1 Topological spaces and manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 The Euclidean group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 The construction of Euclidean 3-space from the Euclidean group 3 Measurement in Euclidean 3-space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Newtonian measurement theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 Curves, lengths and extrema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1 Curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.2 Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 The Functional Derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.1 An intuitive approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.2 Formal de!nition of functional differentiation . . . . . . . 3.4 Functional integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The objects of measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1 Examples of tensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.1 Scalars and non-scalars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.2 Vector transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.3 The Levi-Civita tensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.4 Some second rank tensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 Vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.1 Vectors as algebraic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.2 Vectors in space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 The metric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1 The inner product of vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.2 Duality and linear maps on vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.3 Orthonormal frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4 Group representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5 Tensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6 8 12 13 19 20 24 30 32 32 33 33 34 36 36 42 53 54 55 55 56 57 59 64 65 68 74 74 75 81 85 87
II Motion: Lagrangian mechanics 5 Covariance of the Euler-Lagrangian equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Symmetries and the Euler-Lagrange equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1 Noether#s theorem for the generalized Euler-Lagrange equation . 6.2 Conserved quantities in restricted Euler-Lagrange systems . . . . 6.2.1 Cyclic coordinates and conserved momentum . . . . . . . 6.2.2 Rotational symmetry and conservation of angular momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2.3 Conservation of energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2.4 Scale Invariance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3 Conserved quantities in generalized Euler-Lagrange systems . . . 6.3.1 Conserved momenta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3.2 Angular momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3.3 Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3.4 Scale invariance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The physical Lagrangian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.1 Galilean symmetry and the invariance of Newton#s Law . . . . . 7.2 Galileo, Lagrange and inertia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.3 Gauging Newton#s law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Motion in central forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1 Regularization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.1 Euler#s regularization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.2 Higher dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2 General central potentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3 Energy, angular momentum and convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4 Bertrand#s theorem: closed orbits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5 Symmetries of motion for the Kepler problem . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5.1 Conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6 Newtonian gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Rotating coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.1 Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.2 The Coriolis theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Inequivalent Lagrangians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 General free particle Lagrangians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 Inequivalent Lagrangians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 92 94 97 97 101 101 103 108 109 112 112 114 116 117 117 119 120 122 128 134 138 138 140 143 145 148 152 155 157 161 166 166 170 172 172 175
11.2.1 Are inequivalent Lagrangians equivalent? . . . . . . . . . 178 11.3 Inequivalent Lagrangians in higher dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . 179 III Conformal gauge theory 12 Special Relativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.1 Spacetime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.2 Relativistic dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.3 Acceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4 Equations of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.5 Relativistic action with a potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The symmetry of Newtonian mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.1 The conformal group of Euclidean 3-space . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2 The relativisic conformal group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.3 A linear representation for conformal transformations . . . . . 14 A new arena for mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.1 Dilatation covariant derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.2 Consequences of the covariant derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.3 Biconformal geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.4 Motion in biconformal space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.5 Hamiltonian dynamics and phase space . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.5.1 Multiparticle mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.6 Measurement and Hamilton#s principal function . . . . . . . . . 14.7 A second proof of the existence of Hamilton#s principal function 14.8 Phase space and the symplectic form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.9 Poisson brackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.9.1 Example 1: Coordinate transformations . . . . . . . . . 14.9.2 Example 2: Interchange of x and p. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.9.3 Example 3: Momentum transformations . . . . . . . . . 14.10Generating functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 General solution in Hamiltonian dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.1 The Hamilton-Jacobi Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.2 Quantum Mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation . . . . 15.3 Trivialization of the motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.3.1 Example 1: Free particle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.3.2 Example 2: Simple harmonic oscillator . . . . . . . . . . 15.3.3 Example 3: One dimensional particle motion . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 182 182 184 189 190 191 196 197 203 204 207 208 211 212 215 216 218 220 224 227 232 236 238 238 239 241 241 242 243 246 247 249
IV Bonus sections 16 Classical spin, statistics and pseudomechanics . . . . 16.1 Spin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.2 Statistics and pseudomechanics . . . . . . . . . 16.3 Spin-statistics theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Gauge theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.1 Group theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2 Lie algebras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2.1 The Lie algebra so(3) . . . . . . . . . . 17.2.2 The Lie algebras so(p, q ) . . . . . . . . . 17.2.3 Lie algebras: a general approach . . . . 17.3 Differential forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.4 The exterior derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.5 The Hodge dual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.6 Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.7 The Levi-Civita tensor in arbitrary coordinates 17.8 Differential calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.8.1 Grad, Div, Curl and Laplacian . . . . . 17.9 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 251 251 254 258 261 262 267 270 274 276 280 285 288 289 291 292 294 301

Lecture Notes