×
If you belive yourself, anything is possible.
--Your friends at LectureNotes
Close

Note for ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY AND TRANSMISSION LINE - ETTL By JNTU Heroes

  • ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY AND TRANSMISSION LINE - ETTL
  • Note
  • Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Anantapur (JNTU) College of Engineering (CEP), Pulivendula, Pulivendula, Andhra Pradesh, India - JNTUACEP
  • 9 Topics
  • 7399 Views
  • 237 Offline Downloads
  • Uploaded 1 year ago
Jntu Heroes
Jntu Heroes
0 User(s)
Download PDFOrder Printed Copy

Share it with your friends

Leave your Comments

Text from page-2

Smartzworld.com Introduction  In the previous chapter we have covered the essential mathematical tools needed to study EM  fields. We have already mentioned in the previous chapter that electric charge is a  fundamental property of matter and charge exist in integral multiple of electronic charge.  Electrostatics can be defined as the study of electric charges at rest. Electric fields have their  sources in electric charges.  ( Note: Almost all real electric fields vary to some extent with time. However, for many  problems, the field variation is slow and the field may be considered as static. For some other  cases spatial distribution is nearly same as for the static case even though the actual field may  m vary with time. Such cases are termed as quasi­static.)  In this chapter we first study two fundamental laws governing the electrostatic fields, viz, (1)  co Coulomb's Law and (2) Gauss's Law. Both these law have experimental basis. Coulomb's  to use when the distribution is symmetrical.  or Coulomb's Law  ld . law is applicable in finding electric field due to any charge distribution, Gauss's law is easier  w Coulomb's Law states that the force between two point charges Q1and Q2 is directly  proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the  ar tz distance between them.  Point charge is a hypothetical charge located at a single point in space. It is an idealized  Sm model of a particle having an electric charge. Mathematically,    , where k is the proportionality constant.  In SI units, Q1 and Q2 are expressed in Coulombs(C) and R is in meters. Force F is in   Newtons (N)  and   ,    is called the permittivity of free space.  (We are assuming the charges are in free space. If the charges are any other dielectric  medium, we will use    instead where   dielectric constant of the medium). Smartzworld.com  is called the relative permittivity or the 

Text from page-3

Smartzworld.com Therefore   ....................... (1) As shown in the Figure 1 let the position vectors of the point charges Q1and Q2 are given by   . Let   represent the force on Q1 due to charge Q2.     co m  and    ld .                     or Fig 1: Coulomb's Law ar tz w The charges are separated by a distance of  and  . We define the unit vectors as  ..................................(2) Sm can be defined as  .  Similarly the force on Q1 due to charge Q2 can be calculated and if  represents this force then we can  write  When we have a number of point charges, to determine the force on a particular charge  due to all other charges, we apply principle of superposition. If we have N number of  charges Q1,Q2,.........QN located respectively at the points represented by the position  vectors  , ,......  , the force experienced by a charge Q located at  is given by,    Smartzworld.com .................................(3)

Text from page-4

Smartzworld.com Electric Field : The electric field intensity or the electric field strength at a point is defined as the force  per unit charge. That is  .......................................(4) or,  The electric field intensity E at a point r (observation point) due a point charge Q located  at  (source point) is given by:  m ..........................................(5) is obtained as  ,...... , the electric field  or ld . intensity at point  co For a collection of N point charges Q1 ,Q2 ,.........QN located at  , ........................................(6) ar tz continuous distribution of charges.  w The expression (6) can be modified suitably to compute the electric filed due to a  In figure 2 we consider a continuous volume distribution of charge (t) in the region  Sm denoted as the source region.  For an elementary charge  , i.e. considering this charge as point charge,  we can write the field expression as:  .............(7) Smartzworld.com

Text from page-5

Smartzworld.com Fig 2: Continuous Volume Distribution of Charge When this expression is integrated over the source region, we get the electric field at  the point P due to this distribution of charges. Thus the expression for the electric field  co m at P can be written as:  ld . ..........................................(8) Similar technique can be adopted when the charge distribution is in the form of a line  ........................................(9) ........................................(10) Sm ar tz w or charge density or a surface charge density.  Electric flux density:  As stated earlier electric field intensity or simply ‘Electric field' gives the strength of the  field at a particular point. The electric field depends on the material media in which the  field is being considered. The flux density vector is defined to be independent of the  material media (as we'll see that it relates to the charge that is producing it).For a linear  isotropic medium under consideration; the flux density vector is defined as:   ................................................(11)  We define the electric flux  as  .....................................(12) Smartzworld.com

Lecture Notes