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Strength Of Materials

by Engineering KingsEngineering Kings
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Engineering Kings
Engineering Kings
Chapter No. 1 Title ww Page No. ENERGY PRINCIPLES 1.1 Strain Energy 1.2 Proof Stress 1.3 Resilience 1.4 Proof Resilience 1.5 Modulus Of Resilience 1.6 Castigliano’s first theorem second Theorem. 1.7 Principle Of Virtual Work 1.8 Strain Energy Stored in a Rod of Length L and Axial Rigidity AE To an Axial Force P 1.9 State the Various Methods for Computing the Joint Deflection of a Perfect Frame 1.10 State the Deflection of the Joint Due To Linear Deformation 1.11 The Deflection of Joint Due to Temperature Variation 1.12 State the Deflection of a Joint Due to Lack of Fit 1.13 State the Difference Between Unit Load and Strain Energy Method in the Determination of Structures. 1.14 State the Assumptions Made in the Unit Load Method 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 13 13 INDETERMINATE BMEAS 2.1 Statically Indeterminate Beams 2.2 State the Degree Of Indeterminacy in Propped Cantilever 2.3 State the Degree Of Indeterminacy in A Fixed Beam 2.4 State the Degree Of Indeterminacy in The Given Beam 2.5 State the Degree Of Indeterminacy in The Given Beam 2.6 State the Methods Available for Analyzing Statically Indeterminate Structures 2.7 Write the Expression Fixed End Moments and Deflection for a Fixed Beam Carrying Point Load at Centre 2.8 Write the Expression Fixed End Moments and Deflection for a Fixed Beam Carrying Eccentric Point Load 2.9 Write the Expression Fixed End Moments for a Fixed Due To Sinking of Support 2.10 State the Theorem of Three Moments 2.11 Effect Of Settlement Of Supports In A Continuous Beam 29 29 29 29 29 30 30 w.E asy 2 En 3 gin COLUMNS 3.1 Columns eer 13 13 14 14 27 ing 27 .ne 30 30 30 34 35 52 52 t
3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 ww 3.10 Struts Mention the Stresses Which are Responsible for Column Failure. End Conditions of Columns Explain the Failure of Long Column State the Assumptions Made in the Euler’s Column theory and Explain the Sign Conventions Considered In Columns. Derive the Expression for Crippling Load When the Both Ends of the Column are Hinged Derive the Expression for Buckling Load (Or) Crippling Load When Both Ends of the Column are Fixed Derive the Expression For Crippling Load When Column With One End Fixed and Other End Hinged Derive the Expression for Buckling Load for the Column With One End Fixed and Other End Free Expression For Crippling Load Expression for Buckling Load (Or) Crippling Load Expression For Crippling Load When Column With One End Fixed And Other End Hinged Expression For Buckling Load For The Column With One Fixed And Other End Free Explain Equivalent Length (Or) Effective Length Write The Equivalent Length (L) Of The Column In Which Both Ends Hinged And Write The Crippling Load Write The Relation Between Equivalent Length And Actual Length For All End Conditions Of Column. CORE (OR) KERNEL OF A SECTION Derive The Expression For Core Of A Rectangular Section Derive The Expression For Core Of A Solid Circular Section Of Diameter D 52 52 52 53 54 STATE OF STRESS IN THREE DIMENSIONS Stress Principal Planes Spherical Tensor Deviator Stress Tensor Stress Components At A Point The Energy Of Distortion ( Shear Strain Energy ) And Dilatation State The Principal Theories Of Failure Limitations Of Maximum Principal Stress Theory Maximum Principal Stress Theory 92 92 92 92 92 93 95 w.E 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 asy En gin eer ing 54 56 58 59 61 62 62 62 62 62 63 67 67 68 .ne 101 102 102 t
ww 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 5 4.21 4.22 4.23 4.24 Maximum Shear Stress Theory Limitations Of Maximum Shear Stress Theory Shear Strain Energy Theory Limitations Of Distortion Energy Theory Maximum Principal Strain Theory Limitations In Maximum Principal Strain Theory Stress Tensor In Cartesian Components Three Stress Invariants Two Types Of Strain Energy The Maximum Principal Stress Explain The Maximum Shear Stress (Or) Stress Difference Theory Explain The Shear Strain Energy Theory Explain The Maximum Principal Strain Theory Explain The Strain Energy Theory Theories Of Failure 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 103 104 104 105 w.E 106 107 109 110 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BENDING OF BEAMS 5.1 Unsymmetrical Bending 5.2 State The Two Reasons For Unsymmetrical Bending 5.3 Shear Centre 5.4 Write The Shear Centre Equation For Channel Section 5.5 Write The Shear Centre Equation For Unsymmetrical I Section 5.6 Derive The Equation Of Shear Centre For Channel Section 5.7 Derive The Equation Of Shear Center For Unequa-Lsei Ction 5.8 Derive The Stresses In Curved Bars Us Ing Winkl–Erbach Theory 5.9 State The Parallel Axes And Principal Moment Of Inertia 5.10 Stress Concentration 5.11 Stress Concentration Factor 5.12 Fatigue Stress Concentration Factor 5.13 Shear Flow 5.14 Explain The Position Of Shear Centre In Various Sections 5.15 State The Principles Involved In Locating The Shear Centre 5.16 State The Stresses Due To Unsymmetrical Bending 5.17 Fatigue 5.18 Types Of Fatigue Stress 119 119 119 119 119 120 120 121 122 asy En gin eer ing .ne 135 135 135 135 135 136 136 136 136 136 t
5.19 State The Reasons For Stress Concentration 5.20 Creep 137 137 ww w.E asy En gin eer ing .ne t

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