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Soil Mechanics

by Engineering Kings
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Engineering Kings
Engineering Kings
TABLE OF CONTENT S.NO 1 TITLE PA. NO 1 ww SOIL CLASSIFICATION AND COMPACTION 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Development Of Soil Mechanics 1 1.3 Fields of Application Of Soil Mechanics 2 1.3.1 Foundations 2 1.3.2 Underground and Earth-retaining Structures 2 w.E asy 1.3.3 Pavement Design En 3 1.3.4 Excavations, Embankments and Dams 3 gin 3 1.4 SOIL FORMATION 1.4.1 Residual soils 1.4.2 Transported soils 1.5 Soil Profile eer 1.6 Some Commonly Used Soil Designations 4 4 ing 4 5 1.6.1 Geotechnical Engineering 6 1.7 Structure Of Soils 6 1.7.1 Single-Grained Structure 6 1.7.2 Honey-Comb Structure 6 1.7.3 Flocculent Structure 7 1.8 Texture Of Soils 7 .ne t
ww 1.9 Major Soil Deposits Of India 7 1.9 Phases Relationship 1.9.1. Volumetric Relationships 8 1.9.2. Volume Mass Relationships 9 1.9.3. Volume-Weight Relationships 9 1.9.4 Specific Gravity Of Solids (G) 10 1.9.6 Three Phase Diagram In Terms Of Void Ratio 11 w.E 1.9.7 Three Phase Diagram In Terms Of Porosity asy 11 1.9.10 Relationship Between Dry Mass Density And 12 Percentage En 1.11 Soil Classicification 12 gin 1.11.1 Broad Classification Of Soils 1.11.2 Symbols Used In Soil Classification: eer 13 1.11.4 Brief Procedure For Soil Classification: 13 ing 14 1.13 Index Properties 17 1.14 Engineering Properties 20 1.14.1 Permeability 20 1.15 Compaction 21 1.15.1 Objectives for Compaction 21 1.15.3 Effect of Water on Compaction 22 .ne t
2 ww 1.15.4 Standard Proctor Compaction Test 23 1.15.6 Compaction adopted in the field 27 SOIL WATER AND WATER FLOW 30 2.1 Introduction 30 2.2.2 Classification On Phenomenological Basis 2.2.3 Classification On Structural Aspect 30 30 2.3 Capillary Water 31 2.3.1 Contact Moisture. 32 w.E 2.3.2 Capillary Rise 32 2.3.3 Influence Of Clay Minerals 32 2.3.4 Soil Suction 33 asy En 2.4 Capillarity Pressure 34 gin 2.4.1 Capillary Action (Or) Capillarity: 2.4.2 Contact Moisture. 2.5 Effective Stress Concepts In Soil 34 eer 2.5.1 Submerged Soil Mass: 34 ing 34 34 2.5.2 Soil Mass With Surcharge: 34 2.5.4 Formation Of Meniscus: 35 2.5.5 Saturated Soil With Capillary Fringe: 35 2.5.6 Soil Shrinkage Characteristics In Swelling Soils 35 2.5.7 Bulking Of Sand 36 2.6 Permeability: 36 2.6.1 Coefficient Of Permeability (Or) Permeability. 36 .ne t
Downloaded 2.6.2 Factors Affecting Permeability: 37 2.6.3The Coefficient Of Permeability Determined By The Following Methods: ww Can Be 37 2.6.4 Constant Head Permeability Test 37 2.6.5 Falling Head Permeability Test 38 2.7.1 Importance For The Study Of Seepage Of Water 39 2.7.2 Quick Sand Condition: 39 2.8 Flow Net 40 w.E 2.8.1 Laplace Equation: 40 asy 42 2.8.2 Flow Net Construction: En 2.8.3 Properties Of Flow Net. 2.8.4 Hints To Draw Flow Net: 3 42 gin 42 2.8.5 Flow Net For Various Water Retaining Structures 42 2.8.6 Flow Net Can Be Utilized For The Following Purposes: 43 Stress Distribution And Settlement 45 eer ing 3.1 Introduction 45 3.1.1 The Principle Of Effective Stress 45 3.1.2 Effective Vertical Stress Due To Self-Weight Of Soil 46 3.1.3 Response Of Effective Stress To A Change In Total Stress 46 3.2.1 Vertical Concentration Load 48 3.3.1 Vertical Stress: Uniformly Distributed Circular Load Rigid Plate On Half Space 49 Downloaded .ne t

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