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Note for ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS AND MEASURING INSTRUMENTS - EMMI by Sudipta Dash

  • ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS AND MEASURING INSTRUMENTS - EMMI
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  • Engineering Institute - KIIT
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E16. EMIX. MEASURING INSTRUMENTS [Learning Objective: - Construction and working of multimeter and VTVM and uses] The instruments, which employ electronic devices for measuring various electrical quantities such as voltage, current and resistance etc. are known as electronic instruments. There are a large number of electronic instruments available for taking various tests and measurements. The most common among them is a multimeter. Multimeter A multimeter is most inexpensive electronic instrument that can measure resistances and dc as well as ac voltages and currents with reasonable accuracy. Hence it is a combination of ammeter, voltmeter and ohm-meter. It is sometimes named as AVO-meter (Ampere-Volt-Ohm-meter) or VOM-meter (Volt-Ohmmilliampere-meter). In some multimeters, there is additional provision of measurement of capacitance and decibel level. Multimeters operate in either analog mode or digital mode. Construction (a) A multimeter (b) Basic multimeter circuit [Fig.16.1] A multimeter consists of a small outer case which contains internal circuitry and a number of dry cell. On the front panel of the meter, there are a number of terminals, function – selector and range change switches and a calibrated dial with different scales for different functions. One of the terminal is a common terminal for connection of earth (negative) lead to the circuit or component under measurement. The other terminals are marked by specific function such as voltage, current or resistance. The second lead is to be connected accordingly. But in the instrument having a function-selector switch, the second terminal is also a single common terminal. Internally, a multimeter consists of an ordinary pivoted type of moving coil galvanometer. This galvanometer consists of a coil pivoted on jewelled bearings between the poles of a permanent magnet. The indicating needle is fastened to the coil. When electric current is passed through the coil, mechanical force acts and the pointer moves over the scale. Function A multimeter can measure voltage, current and resistance. To achieve this objective, respective circuits are incorporated with the galvanometer. In an ordinary galvanometer, the needle rests at the centre zero position, but in a multimeter, the needle rests in extreme left position of the scale. (i) Multimeter as voltmeter (i) (ii) Range variation of voltmeter [Fig.16.2]

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When a high resistance is connected in series with a galvanometer, it becomes a voltmeter. Fig.(i) above shows a high resistance R connected in series with a galvanometer of resistance G. If Ig is the full scale deflection current, then the galvanometer becomes a voltmeter of range 0 – V volts. The require value of series resistance R is given by Voltage for fsd= V fsd = I g R + I g G = I g ( R + G ) = I g Rm , where, R m =meter resistance....... (1) For maximum accuracy, a multimeter is always provided with a number of voltage ranges. This is achieved by providing a number of high resistances in the multimeter as shown in fig. (ii). Suppose the full scale deflection (fsd) current in a galvanometer is 50 A and Rm=50  . [For this we may use a resistance R in series with the galvanometer]. So the voltage for the meter considered here for fsd =50×Rm=50× 50=2500  V = 2.5mV . So this instrument can be calibrated to measure voltage upto this low value for full scale deflection. In order to increase the voltage range, let the series resistor to be used be RS. Here we increase V keeping Ig constant. Then, ( RS + Rm ) I g = Desired voltage range V ............... ...... (2) (2) RS + Rm Desired voltage range = = = n (say) (1) Rm Voltage for fsd  RS + Rm = Rm .n  RS = Rm (n − 1) In the meter considered here, voltage for fsd = 2.5 mV.  2.5V  − 1 = Rm (1000 − 1) = 50  999  In order to increase the range to 2.5 V, RS = Rm (n − 1) = Rm   2.5mV   25V  − 1 = Rm (10000 − 1) = 50  9999  In order to increase the range to 25 V, RS = Rm (n − 1) = Rm   2.5mV   250V  − 1 = Rm (100000 − 1) = 50  99999  In order to increase the range to 250 V, RS = Rm (n − 1) = Rm   2.5mV   2500V  − 1 = Rm (1000000 − 1) = 50  999999 In order to increase the range to 2500 V, RS = Rm (n − 1) = Rm   2.5mV  Hence, the meter connected to different series resistors through multi-pole switch acts as a variable range voltmeter as shown in fig.(ii) above. When dc voltages are to be measured, the multimeter switch is turned on to dc position. This puts the circuit as shown in fig.(ii). By throwing the range selector switch S to a suitable position, the given dc voltage can be measured. When ac voltages are to be measured, a full wave rectifier is used as shown in fig. below. The rectifier converts ac into dc to apply to the galvanometer. The desired ac voltage range can be selected by the switch S. When ac voltage is to be measured, the multimeter switch is thrown to ac position. This puts the circuit below in action. By throwing the range selector switch S to a suitable position, the given ac voltage can be measured. It may be mentioned here that ac voltage scale is calibrated in r.m.s. values. Therefore, the meter will give the r.m.s. value of ac voltage under measurement. [Fig.16.3] Multimeter as ammeter

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[Fig.16.4] When a low resistance (called shunt) is connected in parallel with a galvanometer, it becomes an ammeter. Suppose the galvanometer has resistance G. Let the fsd current for the meter be 50 A = I g . It means this meter in its unmodified form, can measure current upto 50 A . To increase the range of this meter, let a shunt resistance S is connected in parallel with the galvanometer. Referring to fig.16.4(i), IS S = I gG IS + Ig G I G G G IS G I G = + 1,  = + 1,  n = + 1  n − 1 = = ,  S + 1 = + 1, Ig S Ig S S S Ig S Ig S G S= ................................. (1) n −1 Required current range where, n= fsd current Hence to increase the range of the current, we connect a shunt S parallel to the galvanometer; the value of the shunt is given by eqn. (1). G G G = = Thus to increase the range to 0.25 mA, the shunt resistance to be used= S1 = 0.25mA −1 5 −1 4 50A 2.5 mA G G = = 50 , so S 2 = To increase the range to 2.5 mA, i.e. n = 50 − 1 49 50 A 25 mA G G = = 500 , so S2 = To increase the range to 25 mA, i.e. n = 500 − 1 499 50 A G G 2.5 A = 50,000 , so S2 = = To increase the range to 2.5 A, i.e. n = 50A 50,000 − 1 49,999 Hence knowing the value of G and fsd current, one can use the shunt resistance to be used for the desired range. Shunt resistances of different values are connected to the same meter through a multiple switch, which is shown in fig. below. With the help of range selector switch S, any shunt can be put in parallel with the galvanometer.  [Fig.16.5] When dc current is to be measured, the multimeter switch is turned on to dc position. This puts the circuit in fig. above in action. By throwing the range selector switch S to a suitable position, the desired dc current can be measured. The multimeter can also be used to measure alternating current. For this purpose, a full-wave rectifier is used as shown in fig. below. The rectifier converts ac into dc for application to the galvanometer. The desired current range can be selected by switch S. By throwing the range selector switch S to a suitable position, the given ac current can be measured. Here, the ac current scale is calibrated in r.m.s. values so that the instrument will give r.m.s. value of alternating current under measurement.

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[Fig.16.6] Multimeter as ohm-meter [Fig.16.7] Fig. above shows the circuit of ohm-meter. The multimeter employs its own internal battery. A fixed resistance R (or R1, R2, R3) and a variable resistance ‘r’ are connected in series with the battery and the galvanometer. The resistances R1, R2, R3 decides the ranges [Fig.(ii)] and the variable resistance ‘r’ is for zero-adjustment. The resistance to be measured is connected between the terminals A and B. To use the ohm-meter, terminals A and B are shorted and the resistance ‘r’ is adjusted to give full scale deflection of the galvanometer. Under this condition, the resistance under measurement is zero. Because the needle deflects to full scale, the extreme right of the ohm-meter scale indicates zero ohm of the V resistance scale. Here, I m = .[Fig.(i)] R+r +G When a resistance RX is connected across the terminals A and B, the current in the circuit V = IX = RX + R + r + G Since the current is inversely proportional to the total resistance in the circuit, increasing the value of RX will cause reduction in current. When Rx is extremely high or infinity, current becomes negligibly small or zero. Thus the resistance scale can be calibrated from right to left as zero to infinity, which is opposite to that of an ammeter or voltmeter. In a multimeter, the ohm-meter section on the front panel is usually marked as R×1, R×10, R×100, R×1k as different ranges; it means the reading on the ohm-meter scale is to be multiplied by 1, 10 , 100  or 1k respectively. It may be mentioned here that while using the ohm-meter, each time it is first shorted across AB and ‘r’ is adjusted to bring the meter reading to zero. This calibrates the meter and accommodates any decrease in the terminal voltage of the battery with age. For lower ranges, 1.5 V battery is used while for k range, 15 V battery is used. Sensitivity of a multimeter The resistance offered per volt for full scale deflection of the multimeter when used as voltmeter is known as multimeter sensitivity. Multimeter sensitivity indicates the internal resistance of the multimeter. For example, if the total resistance of the meter is 5000 ohms and the meter is to read 5 volts full scale, then the internal resistance of the meter is 1000  per volt, i.e. meter sensitivity is 1000  per volt. Conversely, if the meter sensitivity is

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