×
Every problem might not have a solution right now, but don’t forget that but every solution was once a problem.
--Your friends at LectureNotes
Close

Note for CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY - CT by Abimana Alain

  • CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY - CT
  • Note
  • 8 Topics
  • 276 Views
  • 2 Offline Downloads
  • Uploaded 3 months ago
0 User(s)
Download PDFOrder Printed Copy

Share it with your friends

Leave your Comments

Text from page-2

Cement and Concrete Technology (ECIV 3341) Second Semester 2009/2010 Course Outline Course Description: Mineral aggregates; properties and testing. Portland Cement; manufacturing, composition, hydration, properties and testing. Proportioning concrete Mixes. Mechanical properties and testing of hardened concrete. Masonry, manufacturing and testing. Manufacturing, properties, and testing of steel. Metals materials manufacturing and classification. Methods of testing and proportioning asphalt mixes. Classification and properties of wood and plastics. Instructor: Eng. A. EL KOURD Prerequisites ECIV 2204 Engineering Geology Text Book: Concrete, by Sidney Mindess, S., Young, J. F., and Darwin, D., Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood cliffs, New Jersey , second Edition, 2003. References: Materials for Civil & Highway Engineering, by Kenneth N. Derucher and George Korfiatis, Prentic Hall,Englewood cliffs, New Jersey 07632, 1988. Basic Construction Materials, by C. A. Herubin and T. W. Marotta, Reston publishing, Virginia, 1990. Properties of Concrete, by A. M. Niville and J. J. Brooks, Bitman, 1981. Other available relevant references. Course Aims: The main aims is to familiarize students with physical properties and mechanical behavior of various construction materials with main emphasis being placed on concrete. This includes detailed discussions of concrete constituents: cement, aggregates, water and admixtures. Relevant aspects related to fresh and hardened concrete, i.e. mixing, handling, casting, curing, standards, testing, strength, deformation, durability and quality control are also discussed. Other construction materials discussed in the course include timber, Metals and plastics. Special topics and new developments related to the materials used in the construction industry may be reviewed. Course intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs): Knowledge of cement origin, properties and types Knowledge of aggregate properties and classification Knowledge Fresh and harden concrete properties Using concrete laboratory to find concrete properties Course Conduct: Midterm Exam ( 35 points), Assignments & Presentations (15 points ) and Final Exam (50 points). Course Outline: Introduction: constituents, history, advantages, limitations and applications. Aggregates: physical and mechanical properties. Cement: raw materials, manufacture, composition and types, special cements, hydration, tests of cement, paste and mortar. Water: mixing and curing requirements, tests. Admixtures: types, water reducing (superplasticizers), set-retarders, accelerators and air entraining agents. Fresh concrete: workability, segregation, bleeding and tests. Practical considerations: mixing, handling, casting, compaction, curing and removal of formworks. Hardened Concrete: physical, chemical and engineering properties, tensile and compressive strengths, other strength, deformation, elasticity, shrinkage, creep destructive and non-destructive tests. Mix design: influencing factors, various methods of mix proportioning and design of normal strength concrete including prescriptive, standard and designed mixes. Quality control: variation in strengths and compliance requirements. Metal: manufacture, physical and mechanical characteristics, and testing.

Text from page-3

Timber: physical and mechanical characteristics, and testing Course Conduct: Midterm Exam ( 35 points), Assignments & Presentations (15 points), and Final Exam (50 points). Course Outline: Introduction: constituents, history, advantages, limitations and applications (lecture notes) (one hour). Aggregates:physical and mechanical properties (lecture 1, 2 and 3). Cement: raw materials, manufacture, composition and types, special cements, hydration, tests of cement, paste and mortar (lecture 1, 2 and 3) (5 hours). Water: mixing and curing requirements, tests (lecture notes) (one hour). Admixtures: types, water reducing (superplasticizers), set-retarders, accelerators and air entraining agents (lecture 1, Lecture 2, Sika Admixtures, (http://www.sikaconstruction.com/con/con-admixture_in_con-prod-category-hrwr.htm)). Fresh concrete: workability, segregation, bleeding and tests (lecture 1 and lecture 2). Practical considerations: mixing, handling, casting, compaction, curing and removal of formworks (lecture1, 2, supplementary lecture). Hardened Concrete: physical, chemical and engineering properties, tensile and compressive strengths, other strengths, deformation, elasticity, shrinkage, creep destructive tests and non-destructive tests (lecture 1, lecture 2). Mix design: influencing factors, various methods of mix proportioning and design of normal strength concrete including prescriptive, standard and designed mixes (Part 81, part 8-2). Quality control: variation in strengths and compliance requirements. Metal: manufacture, physical and mechanical characteristics, and testing (Part 10-1). Timber: physical and mechanical characteristics, and testing.

Text from page-4

Chapter 1: Introduction Definition of Concrete Concrete is a mixture of cement (11%), fine aggregates (26%), coarse aggregates (41%) and water (16%) and air (6%). Cement Powder Cement + Water Cement Paste Cement Paste + Fine Aggregate (FA) Mortar + Coarse Aggregate (CA) Mortar Concrete Portland cement, water, sand, and coarse aggregate are proportioned and mixed to produce concrete suited to the particular job for which it is intended. Definition of Cement Portland cements are hydraulic cements, meaning they react and harden chemically with the addition of water. Cement contains limestone, clay , cement rock and iron ore blended and heated to 1200 to 1500 C°. The resulting product "clinker" is then ground to the consistency of powder. Gypsum is added to control setting time.

Text from page-5

Definition of Fine Aggregate Normally called sand, this component can be natural sand or crushed stone, and represents particles smaller than 3/8". Generally accounts for 30%-35% of the mixture. Definition of Coarse Aggregate May be either gravel or crushed stone. Makes up 40%-45% of the mixture, comprised of particles greater than 1/4". Definition of Chemical Admixtures Materials added to alter the properties of concrete including: Air entrainment Set accelerators Set retarders Water reducers Air entraining admixtures add microscopic air bubbles to the concrete, enhancing its resistance to freeze/thaw cycles and makes the concrete easier to finish. Set accelerators speed the set-time of the mixture, enabling finishing operations to begin sooner, useful during cold weather pours.

Lecture Notes