×
SET SOME GOALS. STAY QUIET ABOUT THEM. SMASH THE HELL OUT OF THEM. CLAP FOR YOUR DAMN SELF.
--Your friends at LectureNotes
Close

DESIGN AND COST OF BAMBOO AS REINFORCEMENT REPLACING STEEL REINFORCEMENT

  • Project Report
  • 227 Views
  • 1 Offline Downloads
  • Uploaded 2 years ago
Swapnil Dange
Swapnil Dange
0 User(s)
Download PDFOrder Printed Copy

Share it with your friends

Leave your Comments

Text from page-1

ISSN(Online): 23209801 ISSN (Print): 23209798 International Journal of Innovative Research in Computer and Communication Engineering (A High Impact Factor, Monthly, Peer Reviewed Journal) Website: www.ijircce.com Vol. 5, Issue 11, December 2017 A REVIEW ON COST AND DESIGN ANALYSIS OF STEEL AND BAMBOO REINFORCEMENT SWAPNIL DANGE ME Student, Department of Civil Engineering, D.Y Patil College of Engineering Akurdi Pune. SMITA V. PATASKAR Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, D.Y Patil College of Engineering Akurdi Pune. Abstract: The present paper deals with cost-wise comparison of steel reinforcement with bamboo reinforcement. The utilization of bamboo reinforcement as replacement of steel reinforcement is gaining immense importance today, mainly on account of the improvement in the economical aspect combined with ecological benefits. To study the effect of replacement of steel reinforcement by bamboo reinforcement, designs have been conducted on one way slab of size 3000 x 7000 sq-mm with providing beam of 7000 mm length and 250 x 250 sq-mm. In this paper the designs are done on the basis of shearing and bending. Based on this study of cost vs strength provided results have been discussed in the paper. Housing shortage in Urban India due to the rising unaffordability makes it logical to consider alternative technologies for their application. The intention of the research is, to evolve a design using bamboo as one of the chief structural materials, for a safe and durable house, affordable by the urban poor. In this project we will work on to design manually g+1 residential building by replacing steel reinforcement with bamboo reinforcement. Which should be checked or verified by structural designer then we calculate cost of that building and to show the difference between steel reinforcement building and bamboo reinforcement building as well as l life period of structure It is targeted at those Urban Poor living close to bamboo growing regions. The design thus evolved shall clearly indicate the cost reduction, of the superstructure where steel reinforced concrete, is replaced by bamboo reinforced concrete, in key structural elements. A higher cost reduction ratio could help in creating affordable housing markets in most growing cities in India. Proven technologies from all over the world have been examined closely to arrive at the one that would minimize the consumption of steel, which constitutes a large share of the cost of a dwelling unit. This Paper shall project some breakthrough findings on which the overall research has based itself. Keywords: Bamboo, Flexural Strength, Cost Estimation, Economical. 1. INTRODUCTION The world timber demand is increasing at a rapid rate but the timber supply is depleting. It‟s been found through research that bamboo can suitably replace timber and other materials in construction and other works. Industrially treated bamboo has shown great potential for production of composite materials and components which are cost-effective and can be successfully utilized for structural and non-structural applications in construction. Bamboo is one of the oldest traditional building materials used by mankind. The bamboo culm, or stem, has been made into an extended diversity of products ranging from domestic household products to industrial applications. Bamboo is quite common for bridges, scaffolding and housing, but it is usually used as a temporary exterior structural material. In Copyright to IJIRCCE DOI: 10.15680/IJIRCCE.2017. 0510001 1

Text from page-2

ISSN(Online): 23209801 ISSN (Print): 23209798 International Journal of Innovative Research in Computer and Communication Engineering (A High Impact Factor, Monthly, Peer Reviewed Journal) Website: www.ijircce.com Vol. 5, Issue 11, December 2017 many overly populated regions of the tropics, certain bamboos supply the one suitable material that is sufficiently cheap and plentiful to meet the extensive need for economical housing. The world timber demand is increasing at a rapid rate but the timber supply is depleting. It‟s been found through research that bamboo can suitably replace timber and other materials in construction and other works. Industrially treated bamboo has shown great potential for production of composite materials and components which are cost-effective and can be successfully utilized for structural and non-structural applications in construction. Bamboo is one of the oldest traditional building materials used by mankind. The bamboo culm, or stem, has been made into an extended diversity of products ranging from domestic household products to industrial applications. Bamboo is quite common for bridges, scaffolding and housing, but it is usually used as a temporary exterior structural material. In many overly populated regions of the tropics, certain bamboos supply the one suitable material that is sufficiently cheap and plentiful to meet the extensive need for economical housing. With the advancement of science and technology and the tight supply of timber, new methods are needed for the processing of bamboo to make it more durable and more usable in terms of building materials. Studies have been carried out on the basic properties and on processing of bamboo into various kinds of composite products. Bamboo has several unique advantages like ability to grow fast with a high yield and also it matures quickly. Additionally bamboo can be grown abundantly and that too at a lower cost which makes it more economical. 2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Tjerk Reijenga “Role of Bamboo in Green Building Design”. In this project we are comparing steel reinforcement with bamboo reinforcement, its structural and constructional cost and techniques of replacement of steel with bamboo while reinforcing. Ghavami (1995) discussed the mechanical properties of Bamboo, specifically pertaining to Bamboo in concrete. This study showed that the ultimate load of a concrete beam reinforced with Bamboo increased 400% as compared to un-reinforced concrete. It was found that, compared to steel, there was lower bonding between the bamboo and concrete, and the Bamboo had a Modulus of elasticity 1/15 of steel. Bamboo‟s compressive strength was much lower than its tensile strength, and there was high strength along the fibres, but a low strength transverse to the fibres. Stated is the need for the development of a simple design code for the application of Bamboo as a construction material. The United States Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (1966, 2000) reported a study providing a set of instructions on how to properly construct a variety of structures and structural elements using Bamboo. This study suggested not to use green, unseasoned Bamboo for general construction, nor to use un-waterproofed Bamboo in concrete. Concerning Bamboo reinforced concrete, it was found that the concrete mix designs may be the same as that used with steel, with a slump as low as workability will allow. It was recommended that the amount of Bamboo reinforcement in concrete be 3- 4% of the concrete‟s cross-sectional area as the optimum amount. It concludes that Bamboo reinforced concrete is a potential alternative light construction method at a low cost. Amada et al. (1997) investigated the mechanical and physical properties of Bamboo. They conducted a thorough investigation into the structure and purposes of the nodes, which they found to strengthen the Bamboo Culm. They also commented on the advantage Bamboo has over other natural building materials with its fast growth rate. Masani (1977) conducted an in-depth study outlining the proper ways to utilize Bamboo in construction. A listing of the positive aspects of Bamboo is given, citing examples pertaining to its economical, mechanical, and environmental properties. When used as reinforcement in concrete, Copyright to IJIRCCE DOI: 10.15680/IJIRCCE.2017. 0510001 2

Text from page-3

ISSN(Online): 23209801 ISSN (Print): 23209798 International Journal of Innovative Research in Computer and Communication Engineering (A High Impact Factor, Monthly, Peer Reviewed Journal) Website: www.ijircce.com Vol. 5, Issue 11, December 2017 directions are given to insure a better performance, including discussions on waterproofing, pressuretreating, concrete design, and beam design. This study found that the Bamboo reinforcement area should be 5 times the typical steel reinforcement area, and that even when fine cracks develop on the surface of Bamboo, the load carrying capacity of the member is not reduced. The only negative properties of Bamboo given are its susceptibility to attack by insects, fungi and dried bamboo is prone to catch fire. Amada and Untao (2001) studied the fracture properties of Bamboo. In contradiction to other studies, this study states that the tensile strength of Bamboo fibres almost corresponds to that of steel. The main discovery is that the fracture properties of Bamboo depend upon the origin of fracture. In the nodes, it is found that the average fracture toughness is lower than the minimum value of the entire Culm, suggesting that the fibres in the nodes do not contribute any fracture resistance. Power (2004) tells of a study conducted by the U.K. Department of International Development in response to a devastating earthquake that killed 40,000 people in Iran. The engineers were looking for cheap earthquake-proof housing to take the place of mud brick. They constructed a prototype Bamboo reinforced concrete house and used an earthquake simulator to find that the house stood sound during a 7.8 (on the Richter scale) earthquake. They found no cracking in the concrete, the Bamboo to be extremely resilient to earthquakes, and the cost to be split in half compared to mudand-brick construction. Seinfeld (2001) researched the remarkable current uses of Bamboo around the world. In the United States, it is almost completely used as decoration. A discussion is presented on the astonishing feature Bamboo brings to the table as mentioned in other articles. Another special feature about Bamboo is that harvesting Bamboo does not harm the plant, producing more of its timbers. Bamboo buildings are definitely a prospect of the future in the US; however in Asia, the Pacific islands, and South & Central America, they are quite traditional. The main prevention of Bamboo structures in America are building codes. There are not standardized codes for buildings of Bamboo though there are attempts towards them. Bamboo is also still being looked at as a way to clean environmental pollution. It is a consumer of Nitrogen, which could soon be part of a huge effort to prevent air pollution. The American Bamboo Society (2005) provided a very intricate collection of specialized terms followed by their definitions relating to Bamboo. It also has a glossary of questions and answers common to someone new to the topic. These questions ranged from identifying Bamboo, preserving Bamboo, finding help with your Bamboo, to other topics not as closing connected to the research of this project. A study reported in International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) (2002) considered the advantages and disadvantages of Bamboo used as a structural material. The advantages found in their study concluded to be areas of: ecological value, good mechanical properties, social and economic value, and energy consumption. They found disadvantages to be: preservation, fire risk, and natural growth. 3. BAMBOO AS CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL Through research it has been found that some species of bamboo have ultimate tensile strength same as that of mild steel at yield point. Experimentally it has been found that the ultimate tensile strength of some species of bamboo is comparable to that of mild steel and it varies from 140N/mm2- 280N/mm2. Bamboo is a versatile material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio, easy workability and availability. Bamboo needs to be chemically treated due to their low natural durability. It can be used as Bamboo Trusses, Bamboo Roofs Skeleton, Bamboo walling/ceiling, Bamboo Doors and Windows, Bamboo Flooring, Reed Boards, Scaffolding. It has also been found Copyright to IJIRCCE DOI: 10.15680/IJIRCCE.2017. 0510001 3

Text from page-4

ISSN(Online): 23209801 ISSN (Print): 23209798 International Journal of Innovative Research in Computer and Communication Engineering (A High Impact Factor, Monthly, Peer Reviewed Journal) Website: www.ijircce.com Vol. 5, Issue 11, December 2017 that bamboo acts very well in buckling but due to low stresses than compared to steel and due to it not being straight it may not be very good. Further, it has been established that in seismic zones the failure of bamboo is very less as the maximum absorption of the energy is at the joints. Cellulose is the main component present in bamboo which is the main source of mechanical properties of bamboo. Some specific properties of Bamboo are as given below: 1. Specific gravity - 0.575 to 0.655 2. Average weight - 0.625kg/m 3. Modulus of rupture - 610 to 1600kg/cm2 4. Modulus of Elasticity - 1.5 to 2.0 x105kg/cm2 5. Ultimate compressive stress- 794 to 864kg/cm2 6. Safe working stress in compression - 105kg/cm2 Safe working stress in tension It has also been found that bamboo acts very well in buckling but due to low stresses than compared to steel and due to it not being straight it may not be very good. Further, it has been established that in seismic zones the failure of bamboo is very less as the maximum absorption of the energy is at the joints. Cellulose is the main component present in bamboo which is the main source of mechanical properties of bamboo. Some specific properties of Bamboo are as given below: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Specific gravity - 0.575 to 0.655 Average weight - 0.625kg/m Modulus of rupture - 610 to 1600kg/cm2 Modulus of Elasticity - 1.5 to 2.0 x105kg/cm2 Ultimate compressive stress- 794 to 864kg/cm2 Safe working stress in compression - 105kg/cm2 Safe working stress in tension - 160 to 350 kg/cm2 Safe working stress in shear- 115 to 180 kg/cm2 Bond stress - 5.6kg/cm2 CONCLUSIONS In this project we have opted advanced bamboo reinforcement technique instead of traditional steel reinforcement. This is a good idea for low cost economical structure. Bamboo reinforcement technique is used for both main and distribution reinforcement as it was same earlier done for steel reinforcement. It is three times cheaper then steel reinforcement technique. It is clear from results that this bamboo reinforcement technique is absolutely cheaper then steel reinforcement technique especially for single story structure. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] REFERENCES Bhalla , S., Janssen J.A.J “ Design Bamboo As Green Alterative To Concrete And Steel For Moder Structures.” Chariar.V.M., “Fabrication and Testing of Jute Reinforced Engineered Bamboo Structural Elements.” Dutta, B.N. “Estimate & Costing in Civil Engineering.” Francis E. Brink and Paul J. Rush “Bamboo Reinforced Concrete Construction.” Jules.,J. “Designing and Building with Bamboo.” Punamia,B C., Jain, A., Jain,A.K. “ RCC Designs (Reinforced Concrete Structure)” Copyright to IJIRCCE DOI: 10.15680/IJIRCCE.2017. 0510001 4